Posts Tagged ‘Bush’

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New BLOG

March 19, 2009

I have registered a new blog at wordpress.  From now on I will be blogging on the following :-

http://meripehchaanpakistan.wordpress.com

There will be some changes coming there time to time to make it more Pakistan oriented. 

Thank you very much

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The ‘Wrong’ March: Why The Pakistani Military Won’t Intervene

March 15, 2009

By AHMED QURAISHI
Saturday, 14 March 2009.
WWW.AHMEDQURAISHI.COM

 ISLAMABAD, PakistanThe Pakistani military will not intervene to protect President Asif Ali Zardari or his nemesis Nawaz Sharif. Although firmly opposed to intervention as per the wishes of Army Chief Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, the Pakistani military is nonetheless exploring all options to deal with the looming specter of a total collapse of government leading to anarchy across the country.

There is a common feeling in military circles that Pakistan’s elite political class should bear the responsibility for its decisions. The full range of the public administration abilities of these politicians, many of whom have been elected more than twice and thrice, are exposed as sharply lacking. The political class consists of people who are recycled, tried, tested and failed.

 But the ineptitude of Pakistani politicians has entered a dangerous phase now. The new threat includes creating an ethnic confrontation between two provinces, Sindh and Punjab, which could result from the aggressive drive by Mr. Nawaz Sharif to dislodge the Zardari government.

 

This time Pakistanis are seeing a breathtaking failure and irresponsible behavior across the board.

 

 ZARDARI VS. SHARIF

 The incompetence of President Zardari is evident in the manner in which he deliberately pushed all his political enemies to align themselves against him simultaneously. The support for Mr. Zardari’s government from the United States and the United Kingdom is a matter of deep concern for many Pakistanis. These Pakistanis feel that Mr. Zardari’s government is a vehicle for Washington and London to contain Pakistan’s military, intelligence agencies and its nuclear and advanced missile programs. They cite the examples of the behavior of this government in the aftermath of the Mumbai attacks, the attempts to sideline and dismantle ISI, and the acceptance of U.S. military’s aerial and ground border violations. In this sense, Mr. Zardari has few friends within the Pakistani public opinion. His ouster is the demand of most Pakistani nationalists.

But Mr. Nawaz Sharif’s role is no less deceptive and destructive than that of Mr. Zardari’s. The former premier, who is denouncing Mr. Zardari today, played the most important role in helping Mr. Zardari become President. Nawaz Sharif helped Zardari come to power. It is hypocritical for Mr. Sharif now to condemn NRO (the law that Musharraf promulgated on Anglo-American desire to facilitate the return of the Bhutto-Zardari combine back to power) when his own political career is at stake.  Nawaz Sharif’s recent outbursts are not principled politics but revenge. The sorry part is that the lawyers and the media have failed to put this opportunism by Mr. Sharif on the spotlight. 

Mr. Sharif has also declared ‘rebellion’ against the State and has encouraged policemen and government officials to declare mutiny. This is the most dangerous aspect of this crisis. The fact that Pakistani television commentators have almost ignored this dangerous call is surprising. For those Pakistanis who had condemned, in 2005, the rebellion against the State by politician-turned-terrorist Akbar Bugti, Mr. Sharif’s statements came as a shock. It is possible that in the near future, Bugti-wannabes will quote Sharif’s example to justify such rebellions. Their argument will be, ‘You ignore the calls for rebellion from Punjab politicians but condemn those from smaller provinces.’

Another alarming development was how Mr. Sharif resorted to portray his issues with Mr. Zardari as a battle between the entire Punjab province and a President from Sindh.

 This use of the so-called ‘Punjab card’ by the Sharif brothers sets a dangerous precedent. Pakistan’s security managers must stay alert to the possibility of trouble in Sindh if the Zardari government falls. There are indications that subversive elements will stoke trouble by suggesting that Mr. Zardari’s government crumbled due to a mutiny led by Punjab.

This is why it is important that Mr. Nawaz Sharif does not emerge from this crisis with more political influence than what he had before the crisis. Pakistanis are right in wanting Mr. Zardari and his team out, but the Sharif brothers are not the right replacement. This is also why it is important to heed the advice of Chaudhry Shujaat Hussain of the PML-Q. Shujaat has proposed a three-party coalition government in Punjab, where Mr. Sharif will have to share power with both PPPP and PML-Q.  

AMERICA & BRITIAN

It was surprising to see some Pakistani commentators describe the panicked American and British diplomatic moves to save the Zardari government as ‘good this time’ because, in the words of these commentators, the two countries were trying to stabilize Pakistan and save democracy.  

The reality comes with a twist. Such naïveté on the part of some Pakistanis is unfortunate and shows the extent to which Pakistan stands confused and disturbed thanks to the constant barrage of Anglo-American psychological operations, missile attacks, and covert insurgencies being waged against this country by the powers that occupy Afghanistan.

The fact is that Washington and London moved swiftly to save the Zardari government regardless of whether they like Mr. Zardari or not. This is a government in which Washington had made huge investment. It is part of a ‘deal’ linked to the Anglo-American interests in the region.

 It is incorrect that Washington ‘does not trust’ President Zardari, as some Pakistani commentators have been saying recently. The Americans accepted Benazir Bhutto after a long neglect when they felt they needed to counterbalance the Pakistani military and Musharraf, whom America and Britain did not trust.

President Zardari is as acceptable to Washington and London as Benazir Bhutto was when the ‘deal’ was brokered by the two capitals to force a beleaguered Musharraf to share power with someone the Anglo-Americans could trust.

The real problem this time was that President Zardari made an unnecessary move that threatened this government and made the military takeover look good to many Pakistanis. The Americans need this democracy so that they can use its players to counterbalance the Pakistani military in Afghanistan and Kashmir. They know it is easy to meddle in Pakistan. They know that Pakistani politicians are characterless, corrupt and easily buyable through money and power. There are no political parties in Pakistan, only political families with their own interests. It is easy for foreign powers to manipulate these players for their interests.

So U.S. and U.K. intervened to save ‘democracy’ and avert the scary possibility of the Anglo-Americans having to deal with the Pakistani military in the driving seat again.

 LAWYERS’ MOVEMENT

Despite the good intentioned statements to the contrary, the lawyers’ movement has become thoroughly politicized by now. Pakistanis have noticed how Mr. Nawaz Sharif, a political partisan with his own agenda, has become the face of the movement and its official spokesperson.

In 2007, wily politicians too scared to directly confront the military government sheepishly hid behind the lawyers’ movement and used it to topple the military government.

In 2008, the politicians ditched the lawyers and refused to boycott elections under a military ruler.

 In 2009, one politician, Nawaz Sharif, is using the lawyers to topple another politician, Asif Zardari.

Chaudhry Aitzaz Ahsan played a key role in turning the movement into a tool for ambitious politicians. Chaudhry Iftikhar, the deposed chief justice, would have done a great service by decisively shunning this overt politicization. But even he, after being released from house arrest in March 2008, dashed straight to the residence of Asif Zardari, not a president then but the leader of the party in government, to thank him for releasing him. When Zardari shunned him, Iftikhar is now basking in the glory of Mr. Sharif.

 Mr. Sharif is no innocent political player and the message of change that the lawyers’ movement is promoting cannot happen with Mr. Sharif at the helm.

The question is: Have the two Chaudhrys – Iftikhar and Aitzaz – irreparably politicized the noble cause of an independent judiciary? If he is restored, will Chaudhry Iftikhar be in a position to fairly deal with Mr. Sharif and the other political players in the country?

Then there is also this: Pakistan does need an independent judiciary. But this should come as part of wider changes in the entire political system that is falling apart. Merely reinstating a few judges, who are also now politicized, will never solve the problem for good. 

THE MEDIA

The media in Pakistan has also gone berserk, becoming political partisan under the pretext of siding with truth. First its hype helped these failed politicians come to power. The media failed to help the Pakistani public opinion ask questions about the past record of these politicians before electing them. During the run-up to the 2008 elections, the media suppressed any criticism of these politicians under the pretext of fighting dictatorship. And today when these politicians have plunged the nation into another unnecessary confrontation because of their lust for power, the media has readily become a tool in this fight, siding with one party against another. Until now, there is no regulation whatsoever of this important medium of influence. Other countries have sophisticated media management systems that wage diplomatic and military wars. In Pakistan, this important pillar of national security is running amok.

DEMOCRATIC HORROR

If democracy could turn into horror, it just did in Pakistan. Politicians and partisan activists posing as civil society have just turned Pakistan into the butt of global jokes: a nation with vast economic, geographic, cultural and military potential that is unable to produce a mature, educated leadership.

 

This internal chaos is excellent fodder for the propaganda that strong lobbies in the United States have been engaging in against Pakistan over the past two years, trying to convince the world that Pakistan is a dangerous country that desperately needs U.S. military intervention and containment of its nuclear and strategic programs.

The worst part is that even if the judges are restored and Mr. Nawaz Sharif’s government in Punjab is reinstated, this failed political system in Pakistan will keep generating artificial tensions and crises linked to dogfights among politicians over booty. Pakistan is ripe for a major overhaul in its political structure and foreign policy. Sooner or later, the ball will fall in the military’s court. When that happens, the military better be ready with creative solutions because old-style coups won’t work this time. 

© 2007-2009. All rights reserved. AhmedQuraishi.com & PakNationalists

Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article is permitted in any medium

without royalty provided this notice is preserved.

 

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Pakistan in 3008-

March 10, 2009

One of my very good friend sent me this email a while back. First time I read it I couldnt stop laughing and the second time I read it I was of the thought that what if we get there ? .

The “Finish line”. Are we capable enough to make the following possible? Read the following and share your thoughts. Thanks

 

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Pakistan In 3008
 
Two Top American Executives at IBM, USA

Alex: Hi John. You didn’t come to work yesterday
 
John: Yeah. I was at the Pakistani Embassy trying to get my visa.
 
Alex: Oh, really? What happened? I’ve heard that these days they have
become very strict.
 
John: Yeah, but I managed to get it.
 
Alex: How long did it take to get it stamped?
 
John: Man, it was a long queue. Bill Gates was waiting in front of me
and they really gave him a hard time. The poor guy even brought the
property papers for his house in Seattle to show them that he will
return to USA. I went there at 4:00 a.m. to get in the queue and there
were tons of people ahead of me.
 
Alex: Really? In Pakistan, at the US Embassy it only takes an hour to get visa for U.S.


John: Yeah! But that’s because no one in Pakistan would want to come to
USA, except Americans who have taken Pakistani nationality and want to
bring their kids here.
 
Alex: So, when are you leaving?
 
John: As soon as I get my tickets from the company in Pakistan. I’m so
excited. I will be getting a chance to finally fly with the world’s
fastest growing airline, Pakistan International Airlines (PIA). Sort of
dream come true, you know.
 
Alex: How long are you planning to stay in Pakistan?
 
John: What do you mean “how long”? I will try and settle in Pakistan. My
company has promised me that they will process my Green Book as soon as
possible.
 
Alex: Really? Man, you’re a lucky one. It’s very difficult to get the
Green Book in Pakistan. Last year my cousin and his family went there on
a tourist visa and they’re not coming back now.
 
John: Yeah. That’s why I’m planning on marrying a Pakistani girl there
and then sponsoring my parents and my brother and sister from New York
to Pakistan.
 
Alex: But I hear you can find lots of good American girls in Karachi and
Lahore.
 
John: Yeah, but I prefer Pakistani girls. They are so much more superior
to our girls, and what great brunette complexion they have!
Alex: What city are you going to?
 
John: Karachi. The company has an office in downtown Saddar. Yeah, the
salary is good but the cost of living is quite high because of all the
people flocking to this high-tech Mecca.
 
Alex: I hear the exchange rate is now $100 to a Rupee! That’s just too
much. What about Quetta and Peshawar? What are they like?
 
John: No idea. But they are cheaper than Karachi, which is the world’s
headquarters for information technology now.
 
Alex: I hear the quality of life in Pakistan is incredible.
 
John: Yeah, man. You can buy a BMW for Rs.30,000, and a Mercedes for
less than Rs.45,000. But my dream is to purchase a Suzuki Turbo FX-800
which costs roughly Rs.90,000. But what a sweet design, great curves,
and it purrs to the touch.
 
Alex: By the way, which company are you gonna work for?
 
John: Haji Jalal Puttarjee & Bros. Technologies, a pure Pakistani
conglomerate specializing in embedded software.
 
Alex: Man, you’re so lucky to work for a pure Pakistani company. They
are really intelligent and unlike any American body shops that have
opened their fly-by-night outfits in Pakistan. The Pakistani companies
pay you even when you’re on the bench. My friend, Paul Allen, used his
bench time to visit the Makran Coast, the most gorgeous resort in
Pakistan, I hear.
 
John: Yeah, man, you’re right. I hope the US learns something from them
and follows in their footsteps. It seems all we do is borrow more and
more money from the Askari Bank.
 
Alex: How are you going to cope with their language?
 
John: I’ve been learning Urdu since my school days. I always dreamed
that one day I’ll head for Pakistan ever since my uncle bought me that
T-Shirt from Islamia College. At the Consulate they tested my
proficiency in Urdu and were quite impressed by my score in TOUFL (Test
of Urdu as a Foreign Language).
 
Alex: Boy! You’re so damn lucky.
John: Yeah. I’ll be travelling in the world’s fastest train, Tezgam,
I’ll be visiting the world’s largest theme park in Changa Manga, and
I’ll be visiting the famous Lollywood where I might meet the sons and
daughters of movie legends like Nadeem, Sultan Rahi, Anjuman, Reema and
the gorgeous of all, Madam Babra Sharif.
 
Alex: You know, the Pakistani President is scheduled to visit USA next
year and I hear that he may increase the number of employment visas.
 
John: That’s very true. Last month, their Labour Minister, Naswar Khan
Pakhtoon, visited the White House and donated Rs.20,000 for the
re-development of the World Trade Centre at Silicon Valley, and has
promised more if we follow the models of the fast developing high-tech
cities, Gujranwalla and Raiwind. Bill Gates was lucky to have a chance
to meet him. Very lucky person.
 
Alex: Will you be calling on Dave? I hear that he has made it big there
and has a beautiful house on the Lyari River in Karachi.
 
John: Yeah, I’ll be meeting him.
 
Alex: Anyway, nice chatting to you, John. Good luck, you lucky guy.
 
John: Yeah, and the same to you,
 
Alex. By the way, don’t ever go to the Pakistani Consulate in
shalwar-kameez because they will think you’re too Pakistanised and may
doubt that you will ever come back, and your application will be
rejected. And yes, don’t forget to say to the Visa Officer politely:
“As’salam-o-Alaikum, aap kaisay hain?” It will show them you’re a
cultured person.
 
See what u think of this people…..Dont forget to say INSHALLAH after
dis..!!!

 

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Obama & Challenges!

January 22, 2009

President Of United States Of America "Barrack Hussein Obama"

President Of United States Of America "Barrack Hussein Obama"

The bar of challenges has been moved up high for Obama and now there are more chances for him to fail than pass. (I hope it’s not the way I predict!)

American’s have always played politics of the future and in my opinion Obama is just another pawn of America’s dirty politics. He has good motives but I am afraid that they would fade away with the passage of time in the dust of house of congress. It’s known that motives are not constant and fortunately/ unfortunately they change with the prevailing circumstances. With American Presidency being a seat where black has turned into white and white has into turned black for a century, the chances seem to very vague.

In addition to this, U.S Presidency is not a one man show. It involves a share of many other authorities and we cannot forget the former President Bush who can still influence things through his friends within congress. Whether Obama has been pushed on top of the board for a huge success or for a massive failure is a trillion dollar question.

Its amusing to see that without even doing anything Obama has been granted a status of a hero. The real test hasn’t even started. The level of expectation is high for Obama, with too much at stake and too little time. Fumbles and tumbles are on bets for sure.

There is no doubt that speeches of Obama are very inspirational and he has said what a common person wanted to hear. By showing interest in economy, Guantanamo bay, Afghanistan, Iraq, Palestine and the resolution of Kashmir he has no doubt won support of nearly all ethnicities. However, history tells us that the campaign promises are forgotten as soon as the campaign is over. I am afraid of what is coming next for the world. Either it would be cheers of joy or it would bow head in disappointments (yet again!). The posture of newly elected President Obama and his selected administration team in Washington show that they mean business. The recent executive orders have clearly proved it.

Lets us all hope, that the future holds the best for all us.

AHEAD!!!!

AHEAD!!!!

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Indian Bluff

January 2, 2009

An eye opener by my fellow blogger…..
http://pakistankakhudahafiz.wordpress.com/

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Will India launch punitive strike(s) against Pakistan? Highly unlikely. India would have already struck if it had a choice. It doesn’t have a choice for two major reasons:

1. Indians know, they can start a conflict, but where and how the war ends will not be in their control.

2. By tangling themselves in a war, they run a too realistic risk of delivering a mortal blow to their service-based economy, which may not even survive the brinksmanship Indians are engaging in.

Arguably, Indians suffer from the ‘white man’s complex.’ Urbanite Indians love to mimic the American way of life. They imitate the ‘goras’ in ways ranging from their attire to their manner of speech. So much so, they have named Bombay film industry after an American icon, namely the Hollywood. Somewhere during the last decade or so, Indians became so engrossed with the ‘gora complex’ that they began imagining India to be an economical powerhouse and military superpower equating the Americans. Perhaps, it’s this complex which sullied the better judgment of Indian urbanites and their media in demanding punitive strikes against Pakistan.

Nevertheless, after the initial hysteria will ware down, at least some sane Indians will ask, if India could afford such an arrogant behavior? That when the reality will hit them rudely, like ton of bricks, that neither India is America nor Pakistan is Afghanistan.

Despite the ferocious appearance of the Indian military, largely on paper; the fact remains, over 80% of its obsolete hardware is a carryover from the Soviet-era. Indian handicap of obsolete hardware was highlighted during the 2002 India-Pakistan standoff. It was a humiliating experience for the Indians. Operation Parakram cost India about $2 billion in cash and 798 in human cost, and that too without a single shot fired from the Pakistani side.

It was also a disastrous Indian deployment, because even after one year of hostile posturing, they could not cross the border, fearing an all out war ending in a nuclear exchange. That is when India truly lost its supposed conventional superiority over Pakistan. The humiliating pull back effectively closed the doors on India for any future conventional war endeavors; because Pakistani nuclear arsenal was here to stay. However, during the same time Pakistanis were modernizing its arsenal through the rapid induction of modern weaponry like F-17 fighters and precision weapons like the Hatf-8 cruise missiles.

Since then, India has dabbled with nonstarters, like ‘cold start’ doctrine. The idea was to catch Pakistan off-guard by sending a comparatively smaller but highly mobile force across the border at a moment’s notice. It was a nonstarter because of Pakistani equalizer (its nukes); plus they realized they would still have to deploy a considerable amount of logistics and men at the front positions, where they would have remained juicy sitting-ducks for the preemptive PAF air strikes.

The other reason India cannot afford a war with Pakistan is, its economy is too young and still too small to survive through a round of war. Regardless, the havoc it will run on the already distressed Pakistani economy, the war will for sure spell an end to the largely service-based economy, which depends on the foreign investments; and the foreign investments inherently depend on peace driven stability.

A brief look will abundantly expose the facade of the Indian economy; which will collapse at the first signs of uncertainty or instability. In 2008, its external debts increased to around $221 billion. In 2007, Indian exports stood around $145 billion, while imports were around $217 billion; a deficit of $72 billion in a single year.

Its factory output account for 27.6% of the GDP and employs 17% of the total workforce. Rest of the workforce is largely dedicated to the agriculture sector. According to a 2008 World Bank report, 75.6% Indians live on less than $2 per day. It suffers from higher rates of malnutrition than Sub-Saharan Africa. Over 70% its population is either illiterate or educated below the primary level. Indian tourist industry is 1/6 of Las Vegas. Recently, Standard & Poor’s announced, India risk a downgrade from BBB-minus rating to the lowest investment-grade rating. Clearly, Indians are hardly in a financial shape to even contemplate on waging a war.

Indian service industry accounts for over 55% of its GDP. Bangalore is called the Silicon Valley of India. A large number of Information Technology companies are located in the city. It is the largest contributor of India’s $33 billion IT exports (2007). IT giants like Infosys and Wipro are headquartered in Bangalore. Other undertakings headquartered in Bangalore are Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL), National Aerospace Laboratories (NAL) and Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) to name the few.

Bangalore is also called the world’s call-centre capital. Foreign IT giants like the IBM, Microsoft, Dell, Hewlett-Packard, Apple and Cisco have also heavily invested in the city by opening call centers there. These call centers bring in major amounts of service-generated foreign revenues. Their 24/7 operations provide the customer support throughout the globe. An interruption of operations for even for a single day could mean loss of millions of dollars for the foreign investors.

As ugly as it may sound, but that’s what wars are, brutal and ugly. Imagine: far short of nuclear strike, only a couple of bombs or Shaheen-II (with an accuracy of 200m) armed with conventional warheads are dropped on the outskirts of Bangalore. Will even a single foreign company think twice before closing their operations for good? Would they stay around to see if they will get lucky during second round too?

Feel-good slogans like ‘shining India’ don’t help the arrogance clouding the good judgment war-mongering Indians. They can try to start a war on their terms, but it will definitely not end at their terms. Unless India has somehow overcome their fear of far-superior Pakistani nuclear arsenal, or they have found a way to move whole India under kilometer deep nuke-proof shelters, it will not dare to start a war.

Adnan Gill.

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A forwarded email. “Shoes”

December 24, 2008

The pair of shoes which was thrown at Mr. Bush in Iraq has links to Pakistan, said a statement from Pentagon. They have the following proofs:

i) The journalist had visited Pakistan earlier this year. There he was inspired by the shoe throwing at former CM Arbab Ghulam Rahim and Sher Afghan Niazi.

ii) He received his training of throwing shoes by a Pakistan based Jihadi organization.

iii) The DNA sample of leather has revealed that the animal whose skin was used for manufacturing the shoe had traces of grass which is grown in North of Pakistan and this skin was collected by a Jihadi organization on Eid-ul-Adha this month.

Hearing this, President Asif Ali Zardari and Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani have decided to ban the Jihadi organization and launched a country wide crackdown against all the cobblers in Pakistan.