Posts Tagged ‘Policies’

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New BLOG

March 19, 2009

I have registered a new blog at wordpress.  From now on I will be blogging on the following :-

http://meripehchaanpakistan.wordpress.com

There will be some changes coming there time to time to make it more Pakistan oriented. 

Thank you very much

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Musharaf in INDIA! Geo Musharaf Geo

March 9, 2009

 

PAKISTAN-POLITICS/

I would like to thank Saroor Zaidi for the for his brave work and support and sharing the following with his group members.

Geo Musharaf Geo,

An amzing Confident Musharraf has stood tall and proud, and represented Pakistan to the fullest capacity with dignity and power. Mr. Musharraf was harrassed by the Indian Muslims, which we know have a personal grudge with Pakistan, I will not add that in, as it was a cowardless reply from the Indian Muslims. They are far better treated as they are after reviewing there answer and statement.

Enjoy

Arun Poorie: You are here as a messenger of peace. What did you do about it in the nine years when you were in power?

Musharraf: Let’s stop the blame game. We need to look at the reality, forget the past and look ahead. I don’t know what I did wrong, but I can tell you I tried my best for peace between India and Pakistan. I was never negative when the opportunity for peace came to me.

Arun Poorie: What plans do you have about the future?

Musharraf: To me, the core issue is building confidence by greater people-to-people affinity. Once the confidence is there, we should move towards resolving the core issues, and stop meddling with the internal affairs of each other’s country.

 Arun Poorie: What do you have to say about what happened on 26/11 in Mumbai?

Musharraf: Let’s stop the war hysteria. Just a day into the investigations, the Pakistani army and the ISI was blamed for it. I am for a considered and matured response to these issues. As far as the investigations are concerned, the Pakistani government should fully cooperate and the guilty should be punished.

 Arun Poorie: Are there any terrorist camps in Pakistan?

Musharraf: See we have done damage to each other. I am aware of what the Indian embassy is doing in Jalalabad and Kandahar. A terrorist from Kabul has been received by Indian intelligence agencies in India and looked after. I have documents to show this. Let us stop the blame game. India is a big country. You try to do damage to us, we will do damage to you. We should address the trust deficit between the two countries. The ISI does the same thing as the RAW does. There is no distinction.

Ravi Shankar Prasad: In the face of the present situation, do you see Taliban taking over Pakistan?

Musharraf: Areas in the North West Frontier [Province] where the problem is, account for less then one percent of the population. There is no danger of Taliban taking over Pakistan politically.

Arun Poorie: What specific confidence-building measures do you have for the future?

 Musharraf: We need to look at strategic issues. We will have to address the water issue which would develop into a new conflict between the nations. We have to stick to the Indus Valley treaty.

Soli Sorabjee: Will you hand over Dawood Ibrahim to us as a confidence building measure?

Musharraf: This is a small issue. I do not know if he is there. I too have a long list of people that India needs to give us. The role of Indian embassy in Afghanistan in Jalalabad and Kandahar is not good either. Individuals are a small issue. We need to look at strategic issues. I do not think handing over Dawood will change anything. I know it will not help in easing tensions between the two nations, if that happens then you will have to hand over Dawood back to Pakistan (laughs).

Rahul Kanwal: A conversation of Gen Kayani, the army chief who succeeded you, has been intercepted where he said Taliban is a ‘strategic asset’?

Musharraf: This is a lie. He cannot say that. I challenge them to show me the proof. It is a lie.

Amar Singh: When our (then) PM Vajpayee travelled to Lahore by bus to Lahore for friendship, Kargil happened. Now you say you are for peace?

Musharraf: I would not like to comment on this issue. I have dealt with this matter in my book.

Shekhar Gupta: Compare your years in power with that of Ziaul Haq.

Musharraf: The comparison cannot be done as the situation and ground realities were very different in both times. You must understand that Pakistan is not the perpetuator of terror but a victim of terror in the last 30 years.

Question: How is it to live in Pakistan and not be in charge?

Musharraf: It’s good. I am relaxed. The most difficult job was to take decisions in highly complex situations. Now I read about them in the papers.

General VP Malik: What are the chances of the army taking over Pakistan again? How can India help Pakistan in its problems?

Musharraf: It is the internal matter of Pakistan. The political leadership can deal with the situation. I would not like to comment on that. India can help Pakistan by not maligning Pakistani army and the ISI in the world.

 To my readers, I know I have disappeared from blogging scene. I have some personal engagements due to which I am un able to bog but very soon a series of new writings are coming up…..

Thank you

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Obama, Oil & Pakistan

January 22, 2009
Region Of Concerns

Region Of Concerns

January 22, 2009 

America’s military policy is following its foreign policy which follows the smell of oil. Forget freedom and democracy. That’s for fools. Pakistanis are fooling themselves if they think President Obama will be able to change this. Let’s pray he does. The Karachi-Torkham-Afghanistan supply route and the Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan pipeline means that U.S. will have to take effective control of Balochistan, Gwadar and Karachi. This will also help deny Iran and China any stake in their own pipelines across Pakistan. America can’t do this by going to war with a strong Pakistani military. Destabilization is part of the plan, with some margin for unintended consequences. Now you understand the game. By

Ahmed Quraishi | Wednesday, 21 January 2009.

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan—Publicly, America’s most immediate challenge after the government change is Afghanistan and Pakistan. Privately, in Washington’s power corridors, it is oil. Oil, and not al Qaeda, is threatening to knock America off global leadership. President Obama takes over a country whose global economic leadership is threatened by dwindling oil reserves and a dogfight over whatever remains. Oil is running out, fast. And the remaining oil, including new reserves, lie in other people’s lands, closer to Russia, China, Europe and other powers. America’s global supremacy rests on an economic system based on easy access to oil. If someone else gets that oil, America loses. Jon Thompson, an American oil veteran ExxonMobil Exploration Company’s former president, has written in June 2003 that by next decade the world will need 80% more oil than we have today to keep the world going. Luckily for President Obama, his predecessor, George W. Bush, has done an excellent job in: One, securing new oil, and, Two, warding off threat from other oil hungry powers. Under the guise of spreading freedom and democracy, Bush’s eight years saw the biggest expansion of American military bases across the world. And the trail follows the smell of oil. This riddle is as mysterious as the whereabouts of Osama bin Laden. America’s foreign policy was also adjusted to follow the footprint of oil, going where the oil is, be it Angola, Sudan/Darfur, Central Asia, Russia, Colombia, Georgia, Venezuela, and of course Iraq. Somalia is fast becoming the latest battlefield in this secretive global dogfight over oil and transport routes.

In the words of veteran American oil industry correspondent William Engdahl, ‘U.S. military and foreign policy was now about controlling every major existing and potential oil source and transport route on earth […] One superpower, the United States, would be in a position to decide who gets how much energy and at what price.’ The Taliban government was not an enemy of America. It sent delegations to United States and lobbied for U.S. State Department’s attention. Its removal was decided much before 9/11, according to Pakistan’s former top diplomat Niaz Naik, who was told so explicitly by U.S. officials in July 2001. Taliban fell out of favor because they put terms and conditions on the pipelines that American oil giants planned to construct on Afghan territory. Taliban were replaced by U.S. oil consultants Zalmay Khalilzad and Hamid Karzai. Pakistan was and continues to be the next target. U.S. diplomatic meddling has already disturbed the natural progression of the Pakistani government system, leading to instability and creating local players who look to America for support. U.S. military intervention is softening up the country through regular missile attacks and drone flights. The last time this method proved effective was in Iraq during the 1990s.

The chatter in the U.S. think tanks and media about Pakistan’s division along ethnic lines has never been this high. Pakistan has to be subdued in order for American energy and military transport lines to become secure. America needs to secure Pakistani transport routes from the sea to the Afghan border. Balochistan is an interesting case. Destabilizing this Pakistani province disturbs Iran’s plans to lay down pipelines to Pakistan and beyond. The instability also helps destroy China’s chances of using Gwadar, the new Pakistani port city overlooking oil-rich Gulf, to dock its commercial and naval ships. In fact, the entire area between Gwadar and the Sino-Pakistani border is up in insurgencies of all sorts, known and unknown. This is the same route that a future Chinese oil pipeline is supposed to take, linking China to oil supplies from Africa and the Gulf. This entire area was peaceful before 2005, until meddling by unknown actors began from the U.S.-controlled Afghan soil, exploiting Pakistani internal problems. The United States is playing a big role in ‘softening’ Pakistan. It is trying to pitch the country’s elected governments against the military to reduce the military’s ability to decide Pakistani interest on Afghanistan, China and India. Outside meddling is easy thanks to Pakistan’s weak political and government structure. Stopping American intervention in Pakistan, while continuing the cooperative relationship, is the biggest challenge facing President Obama. Will he do it? The facts on the ground are not encouraging. After gaining unprecedented access inside Pakistan – both diplomatically and militarily – it is doubtful that an Obama administration would scale back U.S. gains. Pakistan will have to tell the U.S. that it has legitimate security and strategic interests in the region and that it cannot allow the U.S. to decide those for Pakistan. This includes the shape of the future government in Kabul, the expansion of the Indian role in the region, and the relationship with China. Obama’s Washington has to understand, respect and work with Pakistani interests and concerns. Any other type of relationship won’t work. President Obama needs to wean his policy planners off the idea of reproducing the pliant regimes Baghdad and Kabul. Those things require war. And President Obama doesn’t want another war, does he?

This post is taken from the following:-

http://pakistankakhudahafiz.wordpress.com/2009/01/22/oil-obama-and-pakistan/

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Inside Story PPP & PML (Q)

January 20, 2009

Zardari AND Pervez Elahi Sahab have given final touches to a power-sharing deal over a late night secret dinner at the presidency yesterday.
Significantly, PML-Q President Shujaat Hussain decided to stay away from the meeting and preferred to send cousin Elahi along with brother Wajahat and nephew Moonis to ink an unannounced deal with the president, who is reportedly desperate to get a two-thirds majority in the Senate at all costs in the forthcoming elections in March.
A Property tycoon of Islamabad, who is said to be a mutual friend of both Zardari and Elahi Sahab, was also behind the scene to ensure that his two friends come close together to get rid of Chief Minister Shahbaz Sharif in Punjab. The Tycoon will not be named yet my fellow members.

The sources said that under the proposed deal, Moonis will be the senior minister in the new government in Punjab while Hussain will be the consensus candidate for the Senate along his close aide Kamil Agha.

Both parties have decided to support each other’s candidates in the 5-seat fight in the Senate to thwart attempts by mutual rival Nawaz Sharif to increase his tally in the upper house of Pakistan’s bicameral parliament.

The power sharing deal between PPP and PML-Q is expected to shock a lot of people, but not me. 🙂

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27th December “A Public Holiday”

December 23, 2008

Fireworks of OBLITERATION

Fireworks of OBLITERATION

Shocking Shocking Shocking!!!!

 

 

Pakistan has become a nation which is struggling economically, politically,  where poor is becoming poorer, where stock exchange have nearly collapsed and the governemtn instead of working towards reforms of all the important sector has annouced a public
holiday on the 27th of December.

From now on 27th of December will be celebrated as “Pakistan’s Corruption day”.

All over the world due to economic down turn governments, corporate firms etc are trying to have more days at work instead of having days  of and our struggling nations deomcratically elected government of feudals with an un elected president has made yet another blunder and taken another stupid decision of declaring 27th December a public holiday. What will the holiday be used for? Stonning buses, burning tyres, a few dead bodies on the road and another terror headline all over the newspapers.

Is this goverment here for public and country reforms or is it just doing BHUTTO reforms?

Pakistan needs it-

“People are like stained-glass windows. They sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is a light from within” Elizabeth Kubler Ross

 

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